Get Email Updates

Join us for Chat on Twitter with NOAA Scientist David Alves

David Alves is the Greater Atlantic Regional Coordinator for NOAA Fisheries’ Office of Aquaculture. Dave works on issues related to fish and shellfish farming, permitting and policy in the region.  Before joining NOAA in 2009, Dave was the aquaculture coordinator for the state of Rhode Island for 10 years.  He has held various other aquaculture-related positions throughout his career including a positon with Marine Biotech Inc., in Beverly, Mass.,where he designed recirculating aquaculture systems and research animal holding systems for academic and commercial use. He has a Master’s of Science degree in Zoology from the University of Rhode Island and Bachelors of Science degree in Aquaculture, with a minor in Zoology, from the University of Maine at Orno.  Dave can be reached at David.Alves@noaa.gov.

 Want to hear more about the first federally permitted aquaculture project on the U.S. east coast to grow mussels? or have other questions about aquaculture?  If so....

Join us for a live tweet chat with Dave  

When: October 14 from 3-4 pm

Where: @NOAANERfish   Tag with: #deepwateraquaculture

Want more information?

As a federal agency under the U.S. Department of Commerce, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is one of the primary agencies charged with permitting and overseeing aquaculture.  NOAA is taking a thorough approach to sustainable aquaculture that will create employment and business opportunities in coastal communities; provide safe, sustainable seafood; and complement NOAA's comprehensive strategy for maintaining healthy and productive marine populations, species, and ecosystems and vibrant coastal communities.  To read more about NOAA’s work click on the links below

NOAA’s aquaculture program

Frequently Asked Questions

Basic Questions about Aquaculture

NOAA’s role in aquaculture

Aquaculture in the Northeast (Greater Atlantic Region)

Seafood and Human Health

Feeds for Aquaculture

NOAA and USDA Alternative Feeds

Aquaculture and the Environment